Waste Management Key to Regaining Public Trust in the Arab World- Suhas Dixit Review

The municipal management of household garbage or solid waste is one of the simplest, most common signs of a working relationship between the state and its citizens. Lebanon’s recent problem—of municipalities leaving garbage to pile up uncollected—has caused public outcry and public demonstrations. It is an example of a failed social contract between the state and its citizens. Know more about Suhas Dixit Review on The management of waste in Arab World.

It is, as one local youth put it, not just about services: “The root cause of the waste crisis in Lebanon is not technical but political. There is no political will to solve the problem—from one side mainly because of the failure of state institutions and a deadlock in decision making within the cabinet; and from the other, because multiple political actors with vested interests have been blocking any solution”.

This piece examines three countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region—Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia—each of which have had a unique journey, both in the way they have learned to manage solid waste and in how this has translated into an important part of the relationship that has evolved between their citizens, local authorities, and national governments. Read more

BMC CONFIRMS NEW DUMP YARD IN MULUND, LOCALS RAISE A STINK

The BMC confirmed a new dumping ground at Mulund even as city activists are planning to meet Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis, Municipal Commissioner Ajoy Mehta and Maharashtra Pollution Control Board authorities to discuss the mismanagement of the city’s solid waste.

Thirty-two hectares of land at Mulund, near the Airoli Bridge, has been allocated for solidwaste management. This means that the new proposed dumping ground at Airoli Bridge, and the existing dumping grounds at Kanjurmarg, Chembur and Mulund will take all of the city’s solid waste. The plan is being opposed by locals and Nationalist Congress Party. Read more

Peeping into the Future of Waste

Waste management is an important tool for curbing climate change and for keeping our environment clean and healthy. Methane generated from biodegradable wastes is a powerful greenhouse gas, and when it’s not captured and used as a fuel it contributes to rapid warming of the atmosphere. Estimates suggest that biodegradable waste in dump sites and uncapped landfill sites are contributing far more methane to the atmosphere than previously thought. What’s more, urban food waste is predicted to increase by 44% from 2005 to 2025, and with no proper management in place, will significantly add to global greenhouse gas emissions. Read more

Should plastic bags be recycled or banned?

California has become an interesting test-case for both approaches to one plastic problem.

Back in 2006, California passed a law that mandated a system for recycling plastic shopping bags. Today, supermarkets and other large stores have receptacles where plastic bags can be returned for recycling.

However, a recent report from the Associated Press found that it’s difficult to measure how successful this program has been. They found that the data collected by the Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery has not been analyzed since 2009, when about 3 percent of bags made it to recycling. The department did provide reporters with the raw data: Read more

The Menace of Plastic Water Bottles

Plastic water bottles are a common feature in urban life in the Middle East. The availability of water bottles is common and the cost is affordable by all sections of the society due to which its use and misuse has increased manifolds with time. People also provide it for free in mosques and other public locations. It is because of its easy availability that people misuse this resource considering it free, taking a bottle, sipping it, consuming partly and leaving it at the venue or throwing it in garbage bins. Read more

Water Scarcity in Bahrain

Bahrain is listed among the top ten countries that are likely to suffer from a water crisis in the next 25 years. The World Resources Institute (WRI) have estimated that 33 countries, half of which are in the Middle East, would suffer from a severe water crisis by 2040. According to the study that included 167 countries, the top ten countries that would face water crisis by 2040 are Bahrain, Kuwait, Palestine, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Oman. The finding shows that the Middle East is already probably the least water-secure region in the world as it depends heavily on groundwater and desalinated sea water, and faces exceptional water-related challenges for the foreseeable future. Read more

Introduction to Biorefinery

A biorefinery is a facility that integrates biomass conversion processes and equipment to produce fuels, power, and value-added chemicals from biomass. Biorefinery is analogous to today’s petroleum refinery, which produces multiple fuels and products from petroleum. By producing several products, a biorefinery takes advantage of the various components in biomass and their intermediates, therefore maximizing the value derived from the biomass feedstock. Read more

Warming of Arabian Sea poses threat to fisheries: Scientists

Indian scientists have spotted unusually high warming of the Indian Ocean in the recent years, which may lead to depletion of fish cache in the western sea board in future.

he warming have led to sharp decline in phyto-planckton — tiny marine plants and insects — that is the major food source for many aquatic creatures including fishes. Read more

Future of Solid Waste Management in India

Given Below is the draft of proposed Municipal Solid Waste Management and Handling Rules 2015 to be implemented in India soon. Although the proposed MSW rules 2015 are better than MSW rules 2000, still there are some loopholes that allow corruption in waste management. Read more

reasons why Arctic sea ice matters

The Arctic hasn’t been itself lately. Temperatures there are rising at twice the global rate, sparking an array of changes unlike anything in recorded history. One of the most striking examples is the region’s sea ice, whose dramatic decline over the past decade has led to forecasts of an ice-free Arctic Ocean as early as the 2030s.

Arctic sea ice always waxes and wanes with the seasons, but its average late-summer minimum is now shrinking by about 13 percent per decade, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2015 saw the fourth-lowest level on record, and the nine smallest Septembers have all been in the last nine years. Read more