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Toxic smoke from Bhalswa landfill chokes city- Suhas Dixit Review

Huge plumes of white smoke covered an otherwise clear blue sky in North Delhi on Wednesday, as fires fed by garbage at the Bhalswa landfill raged on. Read Suhas Dixit review to know more about the hazards and precautions.

Small fires at North Delhi Municipal Corporation’s Bhalswa landfill turned into a blaze earlier this week and fire tenders had to be called in. On Wednesday, apart from many smaller fires that can be seen throughout the year, a large cloud of smoke was emanating from the landfill.

At a time that Delhi is embarking on round two of the odd-even scheme and the government is focusing on reducing air pollution, the landfill fires pose not only a direct health hazard, but a challenge to reducing air pollution. Read more

Waste Management Key to Regaining Public Trust in the Arab World- Suhas Dixit Review

The municipal management of household garbage or solid waste is one of the simplest, most common signs of a working relationship between the state and its citizens. Lebanon’s recent problem—of municipalities leaving garbage to pile up uncollected—has caused public outcry and public demonstrations. It is an example of a failed social contract between the state and its citizens. Know more about Suhas Dixit Review on The management of waste in Arab World.

It is, as one local youth put it, not just about services: “The root cause of the waste crisis in Lebanon is not technical but political. There is no political will to solve the problem—from one side mainly because of the failure of state institutions and a deadlock in decision making within the cabinet; and from the other, because multiple political actors with vested interests have been blocking any solution”.

This piece examines three countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region—Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia—each of which have had a unique journey, both in the way they have learned to manage solid waste and in how this has translated into an important part of the relationship that has evolved between their citizens, local authorities, and national governments. Read more

Combatting food waste with effective waste management

Food waste is a major issue throughout the UK, highlighted by campaigns from the government’s waste advisory body, Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), along with the Global Commission on the Economy & Climate. Recent findings show that one-third of all food produced in the world ends up as waste, valuing more than £259 billion per year. However, it’s not just consumers who need to reduce and combat food waste – manufacturers and retailers must, too.

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According to WRAP, over 4.1 million tonnes of food is wasted each year by the food industry, equating to nearly 200,000 tonnes of C02 being produced. Combatting food waste isn’t just about reducing the amount being created, though; it’s also about properly managing the waste that is unavoidable. Read more

Peeping into the Future of Waste

Waste management is an important tool for curbing climate change and for keeping our environment clean and healthy. Methane generated from biodegradable wastes is a powerful greenhouse gas, and when it’s not captured and used as a fuel it contributes to rapid warming of the atmosphere. Estimates suggest that biodegradable waste in dump sites and uncapped landfill sites are contributing far more methane to the atmosphere than previously thought. What’s more, urban food waste is predicted to increase by 44% from 2005 to 2025, and with no proper management in place, will significantly add to global greenhouse gas emissions. Read more

Waste Reduction

This is the idea of not making too much waste in the first place. It is that simple, and it sounds like commonsense, but technically, it is not that straight forward. Our lifestyles are wired in a way that makes us consume more and more of ready-made goods, many of them designed to be discarded after just one use. A single visit to the coffee shop means a couple of paper towels, food wrappers and plastic cup or bottle will end up in the bin. More to that, businesses are hungry for more profits, and would do anything to get people to buy over and over again. This means that many of them are not really bothered about the damage we are doing to our environment. Read more

The American recycling business is a mess: Can Big Waste fix it?

In 1987, a tugboat named Mobro 4000 set out from New York Harbor with more than 6 million pounds of decaying waste collected from across New York City. The trash-bearing vessel was bound for a landfill in North Carolina, where it was refused. It then wandered as far as Mexico and Belize, looking for a place to unload.

ELKRIDGE, MD - JUNE 18: Workers are seen sorting as the conveyor belt moves recyclables to be sorted at the Waste Management Elkridge Material Recycling Facility on June 18, 2015 in Elkridge, Md. D.C. and other local jurisdictions send their recyclable materials to the Waste Management facility in Elkridge for recycling. The cardboard and paper products are baled and shipped to China for new product production. The facility is a one thousand ton facility, where it takes in a thousand tons and sends out a thousand tons daily. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

ELKRIDGE, MD – JUNE 18: Workers are seen sorting as the conveyor belt moves recyclables to be sorted at the Waste Management Elkridge Material Recycling Facility on June 18, 2015 in Elkridge, Md. D.C. and other local jurisdictions send their recyclable materials to the Waste Management facility in Elkridge for recycling. The cardboard and paper products are baled and shipped to China for new product production. The facility is a one thousand ton facility, where it takes in a thousand tons and sends out a thousand tons daily. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Newspapers followed the tugboat’s 5,000-mile voyage, sounding alarm bells over a national garbage crisis. Johnny Carson led The Tonight Show by suggesting the Mobro make a beeline for Iran, and a New York Times editorial called it a “floating Paul Revere,” warning Americans of the threat of their trash.
After months of rejection, the barge eventually returned with its trash to New York, where it was festooned with an enormous banner, drawn up by Greenpeace activists, that read, “Next Time Try Recycling.” Suddenly, America had to pay attention to its garbage problem. Read more

Recycling and Waste-to-Energy Prospects in Saudi Arabia

recycling-saudi-arabia-1The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia produces around 15 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) each year with average daily rate of 1.4 kg per person. With the current growing population (3.4% yearly rate), urbanization (1.5% yearly rate) and economic development (3.5% yearly GDP rate), the generation rate of MSW will become double (30 million tons per year) by 2033. The major ingredients of Saudi Arabian garbage are food waste (40-51 %), paper (12-28 %), cardboard (7 %), plastics (5-17 %), glass (3-5 %), wood (2-8 %), textile (2-6 %), metals (2-8 %) etc. depending on the population density and urban activities of that area. Read more

Plastic Pipe Recycling

Green Ant Plastic Recycling offer a wide range of plastic recycling services across the UK, including a service for plastic pipe recycling this includes plastic water pipe recycling, plastic gas pipe recycling  and plastic utility pipe recycling.

We are actively facilitating  plastic recycling of UK thermoplastic  waste including yellow gas pipe and blue water pipes and other plastic raw materials, to increase the UK plastic recycling rate and help the  country meet its plastic recycling targets. Read more

The Internet Of Things And Water Management

Flying across the country, looking down, the world simplifies with distance into a network of roads, rails, and runways, connecting every business site to any and every other business site in the world. A multi-branched delivery web that brings water, power, sewer, and Internet. The destination? The last mile, where things happen and where things get done.

If you manage or own a business facility, you know it’s not ever just one thing that can cause havoc, but an ever changing stream of “things.” A stream that can quickly escalate into flood stage at shocking speeds if you’re not careful. Sprinkle in some good old fashion stupid with those “things” and that’s the stuff that costs facilities fortunes. However, the ability to manage this avalanche of “things” is what has everyone so excited about the Internet of Things (IoT). There is now the opportunity to turn real-time site data into actionable knowledge that saves facilities substantial money and time. Today, a growing number of businesses are using IoT to tame one of the most powerful “things” at the last mile: Water. Read more

Care About Wildlife? Here’s Why You Should Kick the Bottled Water Habit Today

There are many reasons why bottled water is drawing criticism lately. From the incredible amount of plastic pollution that stems from mismanaged plastic water bottles, to the threat of hazardous chemicals leaching from the plastic, to the controversial water harvesting practices of some bottled water companies, to the fact that bottled water is no healthier than tap water, the practice of bottling water is definitely not popular with many crowds.17421612492_ac45b19f8c_z

And while bottled water may serve a degree of reliability in times of natural disaster or compromised water service, the widespread embrace of this $100 billion industry on a daily basis is just not as convenient or healthy as some companies have it cracked up to be. In fact, it’s proving to be anything but convenient or healthy for wildlife. If you care about birds, fish, insects and any number of other creatures, this is one industry you won’t want to be supporting any longer. From the harvest of water by bottling companies to the manufacture and eventual disposal of the plastic bottles, bottled water is truly a danger to wildlife all over the planet. Read more